Incorporating Students’ Perspectives in the Design of Peer Review Activities

By Adam Loretto, Sara DeMartino, and Amanda Godley In our previous post, we discussed students’ views of peer review: that, despite some potential pitfalls, it can be useful to hear from multiple perspectives and to have opportunities in both giving and receiving feedback to develop skills as writers with real audiences. In this post, we…

Write Here, Right Now

By Amber Jensen In the years I’ve spent as a student and a teacher in middle and high school, I have both asked and been asked the ubiquitous question: “But why do we have to learn this?” And I’ve told and been told the answer that so often follows: “You’re going to need to know…

A Year in the Life of Writers Who Care

At the end of 2017, we are thankful for the many contributions that have made Teachers, Parents, Profs: Writers Who Care an ongoing voice for authentic writing instruction.  In 2017, the Writers Who care blog had over 21,000 visitors from countries all over the world. We published 20 new posts written by teachers, parents, and…

Photo reads, "Author-ity"

School Writing vs. Authentic Writing

By this point in the fall, parents, students and teachers have all begun to settle into school routines. The work that is arriving home in students’ backpacks and laptops is probably more involved and extensive than it was in September. As our students begin to write more for school, we should always look carefully at…

Engaging Writers on the Autism Spectrum

Laura Sabella, Ph.D., University of South Florida A Teacher’s Discovery Ashley is an 8th grade language arts teacher in a mainstream class. She prides herself on offering myriad fun writing assignments to which most of her students respond enthusiastically, and most students are engaged. However, Ashley struggles to find writing opportunities that engage Ben, a…