Writing in the Work World

By Ann D. David, Dorothy Meiburg Weller, and Amber Funderburgh As we discussed in our post about college readiness in writing, we have spent some time thinking about what it means to write beyond the bounds of the K-12 classroom. When we first started our inquiry, writing in the world of work was something none…

Why Teachers’ Writing Matters

by Meg Petersen Children need to see adults writing.  Cathy Fleischer’s post provides excellent tips for ways parents can encourage their children’s writing, including writing to and with them.  And it makes sense that teachers of writing should write.  Writing gives us a kind of authority (“author”-ity) that allows us to work more confidently with…

“Born Ready”: Literacy Ability as Nature or Nurture?

by Dawn Kirby Last month, prior to her graduation from high school, my daughter was preparing for her Advanced Placement (AP) test in Literature and Language. Because of her high school’s scheduling quirks, AP tests occur an entire semester after she takes some AP classes. Busy teenagers can forget lots of academic material in 18…

College Readiness in Writing: What does that really mean?

By Ann David, Dorothy Meiburg Weller, and Amber Funderburgh Teachers, students, and families around the country have finished the last school assignment, packed up lockers and rooms, and are headed into summer.  Summer is about vacation, and looking ahead to next year.  Teachers are rethinking their instruction, perhaps because of Common Core, while students and families…

Writing Assessment: A Creative Approach

By Jeremy Hyler In April, I wrote a post about standardized testing. In that post I mentioned how students’ confidence could rise if they were given the opportunity to do more authentic assessments where they could be creative. Unfortunately, standardized testing does not allow for this.  Students can’t demonstrate their knowledge through any other mode…