Writing as a Path to Healing

By Roberta P. Gardner One of my earliest memories of writing in school was a failed scribble drawing of my deceased cat, Honey. She wasn’t officially my cat, but I was the one who played with her every day, and I let her know that she was loved. I used to sneak her bowls of milk…

Fight Back Against Fundamentally Flawed Regulations

By Melanie Shoffner, Rebecca Powell, Anne Elrod Whitney, and Don Zancanella In today’s environment of school accountability and high-stakes testing, teachers are constantly labeled as uncaring, unprepared, and ineffective. Patently unqualified corporations, millionaires and profit-driven businesses are invited to “solve” educational issues, while patently qualified teachers, teacher educators, and educational researchers are excluded from the…

Proposed Regulations Bad for Kids, Teachers, and Schools

by Anne Elrod Whitney, Ph.D. Report cards may sound simple and harmless. But the “report cards” for teacher education programs that were recently proposed by the U.S. Department of Education are a bad idea. They, and the proposed new federal rules of which they are a part, could do tremendous damage to schools, to colleges,…

Writing in the Work World

By Ann D. David, Dorothy Meiburg Weller, and Amber Funderburgh As we discussed in our post about college readiness in writing, we have spent some time thinking about what it means to write beyond the bounds of the K-12 classroom. When we first started our inquiry, writing in the world of work was something none…

Why Teachers’ Writing Matters

by Meg Petersen Children need to see adults writing.  Cathy Fleischer’s post provides excellent tips for ways parents can encourage their children’s writing, including writing to and with them.  And it makes sense that teachers of writing should write.  Writing gives us a kind of authority (“author”-ity) that allows us to work more confidently with…

“Born Ready”: Literacy Ability as Nature or Nurture?

by Dawn Kirby Last month, prior to her graduation from high school, my daughter was preparing for her Advanced Placement (AP) test in Literature and Language. Because of her high school’s scheduling quirks, AP tests occur an entire semester after she takes some AP classes. Busy teenagers can forget lots of academic material in 18…