Calls for Blog Posts

SPRING CALL: Poetry

Submissions due May 31, 2021

Poetry can serve so many purposes in our lives. As parents, teachers, and teacher educators, we recognize the value of reading diverse poetry in our lives and in our classrooms (#verselove #teachlivingpoets). Perhaps even more importantly, we recognize the importance of writing poetry in our own lives and classrooms.

Writing poetry help us collect and clarify our thoughts and experiences, discover things we didn’t already know, express ourselves with no limits, and process complex emotions. Poems can also be a means for sharing our experiences with others, connecting with others heart to heart, making readers laugh, cry, smile, feel. Beyond these larger purposes, writing poetry also changes our relationship to words, punctuation, and form—creating need for both particularity and play. 

April is National Poetry Month, and there are lots of resources out there for celebrating the power of poetry this month and all year long. (Check out this list from Poets.org or this one from the National Writing Project.) We’d like to hear how poetry fits in your lives and classrooms. 

In addition to posts on any topic related to writing and teaching authentic writing, we invite stories from teachers, English educators, and parents for the Writers Who Care blog that respond to this themed call. Please see the blog for submission guidelines. Please submit your piece by <ay 15, 2021.

Ideas for teacher-writers:

  • How do you incorporate poetry writing in your classrooms? What invitations for writing poetry do you include and how do students take up those invitations? What are your favorite strategies for writing poetry to share with students? 
  • What connections do you see between reading poetry and creating authentic opportunities for writing poetry with your students?
  • How does writing poetry in your own life inform your teaching practice and/or support you beyond school?

Ideas for English educator writers:

  • How does writing poetry fit into your vision for preparing or sustaining classroom teachers? 
  • How do you create opportunities for teachers to write poetry and how do you see that writing work as connected to their teaching?
  • How does writing poetry in your own life inform your teaching practice and/or support you beyond school?

Ideas for parent-writers:

  • Where does poetry live in your home? How do you incorporate poetry writing with your children?
  • How does writing poetry in your own life support you as a parent-teacher?

Call for Blog Posts: Writing for Civic Engagement

Posts due March 15, 2021
Every four years, the weeks leading up to November become filled with conversations about the election. This year, the events of 2020 prompted the election season to extend far beyond election day. With record voter turnout, mistrust in the fidelity of voting methods, and people’s lives at stake, the 2020 presidential election was more contentious than ever. We know that students in our classrooms had opinions on many of the major issues impacting the election: the response to and rates of COVID-19 cases, attempts for a more inclusive vs. exclusive approach towards minoritized populations in our country, access to healthcare, and more. In this call we encourage you to share how you supported and encouraged civic engagement in your classrooms. What did you do in your classrooms to create space for conversions around or surrounding the election? In what ways were specific social issues discussed or ignored? How was writing used as a tool to support and encourage thinking around the election?
In addition to posts on any topic related to writing and teaching authentic writing, we invite blog posts from teachers, English educators, and parents for the Writers Who Care blog that respond to this themed call. Please see the blog for submission guidelines. Please submit your piece by January 30, 2021.
Ideas for teacher-writers:

  • How did the election impact your classroom? Where in students’ work and ideas was it evident?
  • In what ways did you use writing to encourage students to explore and develop their opinions about the election or contentious issues more broadly?
  • What were some of the challenges you had creating space for political conversations in your class? In what ways did or could writing support or restrict these conversations?

Ideas for English educator writers:

  • In what ways was it seamless to bring in issues around the election into your teaching and in what ways was it forced?
  • How did you use writing to help your students explore and develop their opinions about the election or contentious issues more broadly?
  • What did the conversations sound like in your classes around the election? How were they informed by various experiences, texts, or environments?

Ideas for parent-writers:

  • How are you using writing to help your children grapple with current events?
  • What did the conversations sound like in your home around the election? How were they informed by various experiences, texts, or environments?